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CDD Executive Director Jeff Chester wrote in an email Thursday that child privacy advocates had scored a significant victory as the FTC had ordered Riyo to immediately destroy any data it gathers from a child or parent. The organization holds, however, that the mechanism for parental consent using facial recognition is ill-advised. “While facial recognition technology has many applications, its role protecting children’s privacy is unproven,” Chester added.

Source: FTC allows ‘selfies’ for parental consent under COPPA | CIO

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This letter is to inform you that the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC” or “Commission”) has reviewed Jest8 Limited’s (trading as Riyo) (“Riyo”) application for approval of a proposed verifiable parental consent (“VPC”) method under the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule (“COPPA” or “the Rule”). The Commission has determined that the proposed VPC mechanism is “reasonably calculated, in light of available technology, to ensure that the person providing consent is the child’s parent.” Accordingly, the FTC approves the proposed method.

Read PDF @ FTC

Source: Commission Letter Approving Application Filed by Jest8 Limited (Trading As Riyo) For Approval of A Proposed Verifiable Parental Consent Method Under the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule – 151119riyocoppaletter.pdf

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The Federal Trade Commission has approved a new method for companies to get parents’ consent for their children to access online services covered by the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) Rule. Based on an application submitted by Riyo, Inc., the Commission has approved the use of “face match to verified photo identification” (FMVPI) as a method to verify that the person providing consent for a child to use an online service is in fact the child’s parent. Under the COPPA Rule, online sites and services directed at children must obtain permission from a child’s parents before collecting personal information from that child. The rule lays out a number of acceptable methods for gaining parental consent, but also includes a provision allowing interested parties to submit new verifiable parental consent methods to the Commission for approval. FMVPI is a two-step process. In the first step, a parent provides an image of their photo identification, such as a passport or driver’s license. The authenticity and legitimacy of the document is then verified using various technologies that analyze the image to ensure that it is an authentic government-issued identification. In a second step, the parent is then prompted to provide a picture of themselves taken with a phone or web camera, which is analyzed to confirm that the photo is of a live person and not a photo of a still photo. The image is then compared to the identification photo using facial recognition technology to confirm whether the person submitting the photo is the one in the identification.  The process includes certain privacy safeguards such as requiring encryption and prompt deletion of any personal information that is collected. The Commission vote to issue the letter and accept FMVPI as an acceptable verifiable parental consent method was 4-0. The Federal Trade Commission works for consumers to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices and to provide information to help spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint in English or Spanish, visit the FTC’s online Complaint Assistant or call 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357). The FTC enters complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure, online database available to more than 2,000 civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad. The FTC’s website provides free information on a variety of consumer topics. Like the FTC on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to press releases for the latest FTC news and resources.

Leading US kids virtual world Roblox is now boasting 100% kid-safe advertising, thanks to a new partnership with SuperAwesome out of the UK. The incorporation of SuperAwesome’s platform into the digital game-building site will open up Roblox and its 15 million user-generated games to COPPA-compliant advertising opportunities and brand integrations in both the US and the UK.

Source: SuperAwesome and Roblox join forces on kid-safe advertising » Kidscreen

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To comply with COPPA, Internet service providers must obtain verified parental consent from parents COPPA – facial recognition for verified parental consentbefore collecting personal information from those children of the parents who are under 13 years of age. The process for obtaining parental consent has always been an area where the FTC and companies have struggled a bit to arrive at a simple, seamless technique. Facial recognition software may ultimately provide the best solution to this quandary.

Source: Facial Recognition For Providing Verified Parental Consent Under COPPA?

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If your child has his or her own smartphone — or he or she just loves borrowing yours to play the latest games — the Federal Trade Commission is advising caution. The FTC found in a recent report that developers who make apps specifically geared towards children have done little to address privacy concerns since the commission’s first report on children’s apps earlier this year. According to the new report, app developers still aren’t doing enough to teach parents what kind of data is being collected from their children, where that data winds up or who can access it.

Source: FTC: ‘Little Progress’ in Privacy and Children’s Apps

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App Makers Playing Dangerous Game With Personal Privacy by Gavin O’Malley (1)Threatening to bust the mobile boom, app makers are playing a dangerous game with people’s personal information.That’s according to new and highly credible research, which tested 110 of the most popular Android and iOS apps on the market to see which ones shared personal, behavioral, and location data with third parties.

Source: App Makers Playing Dangerous Game With Personal Privacy 11/06/2015

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In a decision that is reverberating across the digital economy, the European Court of Justice on Tuesday struck down a transatlantic agreement that enables companies to transfer data from Europe to the United States, finding that European data is not sufficiently protected in the United States.

via Top E.U. court strikes down major data-sharing pact between U.S. and Europe – The Washington Post.

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This has bad idea written all over it. If every state sets an age and behavior limit on visitors there will be no way a site or service can restrict for every jurisdiction.

COPPA and now DOPPA are illegal due to the The Convention on the Rights of the Child under the United Nations.

 

Delaware Attorney General Matt Denn is serious about online privacy, and aims to make Delaware “the safest state in America for kids to use the internet.” This August, Delaware Governor Jack Markell signed into law four online privacy bills drafted by the Attorney General, the most substantial of which is the Delaware Online Privacy and Protection Act.

COPPA, Meet DOPPA – Delaware AG Action Leads to New Child-Protection Data Privacy Laws | Foley Hoag – Privacy & Data Security – JDSupra.

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