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CDD, joined by the Electronic Privacy Information Center, filed comments at the FTC yesterday opposing the request by AssertID that the commission approve a new method of verifiable parental consent under COPPA (Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act). The proposed method would mine parents’ online social network information and ask third parties to judge whether that information is truthful or not, a method based on a “trust score” algorithm that the company claims is confidential and secret from the public. CDD asked the commission to oppose the application because it lacked information that explains how it assures that consenting parties are parents, and it leaves big questions about what the company is going to do with information it requires from parents.

via CDD and EPIC Tell FTC to Reject AssertID’s Proposal for COPPA Parental Consent Scheme | Center For Digital Democracy.

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Social News Daily

Facebook Is Not Suitable For Kids Under 13, Center For Digital Democracy ...
Social News Daily
Facebook's own privacy settings are not setup to protect children and the updated Federal Trade Commission (FTC) rules to the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) offer very little protection for children when it comes to the true scope of ...

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Short but good post from ThirdParent. Two sites concern me the most in this post. First, it’s very hard not to see porn on tumblr. If it isn’t illegal it’s OK it seems. Yahoo buying it has toned things down a bit buy restricting certain search terms but your kid might become more familiar than you want them to be with hard core stuff on tumblr. On the other hand, how can you really stop them from going there?

Snapchat like any chat system gives me concerns. A lot of time chats are posted on social media sites which means you have no idea who is going to show up. Also, real time chats with strangers is a good way to be harassed or bullied so kids should be told to block anyone that is getting out of control. A bully wants attention. If you fight them online then they already won because they got that attention and distracted from whatever you wanted to accomplish.

At least a handful of times per week, I have a conversation with another parent about what ThirdParent does, why it’s important and how that other parent thinks about what her kids are doing on the internet and social media.

via Kayla Doesn’t Have a Facebook | ThirdParent.

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This is a real good Q&A that I invite you to read.

Written By: Tim Kridel

More than half of app users have uninstalled or decided to not install an app due to concerns about personal information, according to a recent Pew Internet Project survey. If that isn’t motivation enough to protect customer privacy, consider the growing number of federal and state laws penalizing breaches.

But how can developers determine which laws apply? And what about industry best practices such as those from the Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) and CTIA – The Wireless Association? We spoke with Alan Chapell, co-chair of the MMA’s privacy and advocacy committee, about what developers need to know to protect customer privacy — and, in the process, their app’s market potential.

via Rules For Developers to Protect Users’ Privacy – Technology Digital.

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From Consumer Reports:

But the act was passed in 1998, when the founder of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, was only 14, and touch-screen tablets were mostly the stuff of science fiction. As technology advanced and data collecting expanded, there were lots of questions about what the act did and didn’t cover. It became clear that the law was in serious need of an update.

via Online Privacy | COPPA | Internet Security – Consumer Reports.

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FPF is committed to helping the app marketplace comply with the FTC’s revised Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act COPPA rule. As explained in our public comments filed with the FTC, we think that one way to help companies and parents alike is to encourage collaboration.

via New Survey on App Stores and Account Info Sharing – What This Means for COPPA | Future of Privacy.

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You’re 10 years old. You love the idea of putting your thoughts and opinions out there for the world to see—but perhaps you aren’t quite ready for mega-trafficked social media platforms like Facebook and YouTube. Age restrictions set by these sites aside, you may not being thinking all that much about the consequences of revealing personal information or the risks of connecting with strangers. But, naturally, interacting with friends and being social is a big part of your tween and teen years. What do you do?

via KidzVuz: What Tweens Think About Everything – New York Family Magazine.

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As the reality sinks in – that COPPA 2.0, which as of July 1st is now the law of the land – mobile app developers need to consider how to achieve compliance with these new regulations. If you’ve been resisting COPPA to this point, it’s probably time to understand the options available to you, choose one that is consistent with your objectives and move forward.

via AssertID | Promoting trust and civility in online interactions.

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