coppa news

  

In a decision that is reverberating across the digital economy, the European Court of Justice on Tuesday struck down a transatlantic agreement that enables companies to transfer data from Europe to the United States, finding that European data is not sufficiently protected in the United States.

via Top E.U. court strikes down major data-sharing pact between U.S. and Europe – The Washington Post.

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This has bad idea written all over it. If every state sets an age and behavior limit on visitors there will be no way a site or service can restrict for every jurisdiction.

COPPA and now DOPPA are illegal due to the The Convention on the Rights of the Child under the United Nations.

 

Delaware Attorney General Matt Denn is serious about online privacy, and aims to make Delaware “the safest state in America for kids to use the internet.” This August, Delaware Governor Jack Markell signed into law four online privacy bills drafted by the Attorney General, the most substantial of which is the Delaware Online Privacy and Protection Act.

COPPA, Meet DOPPA – Delaware AG Action Leads to New Child-Protection Data Privacy Laws | Foley Hoag – Privacy & Data Security – JDSupra.

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The Federal Trade Commission is seeking public comment on a proposed verifiable parental consent method that Riyo has submitted for Commission approval under the agency’s Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule.

Under the rule, online sites and services directed at children must obtain permission from a child’s parents before collecting personal information from that child. The rule lays out a number of acceptable methods for gaining parental consent, but also includes a provision allowing interested parties to submit new verifiable parental consent methods to the Commission for approval.

In a Federal Register notice to be published shortly, the FTC is seeking public comment about the proposed Riyo verifiable parental consent method including whether the proposed method is already covered by existing methods under the rule and whether it meets the rule’s requirement that it be reasonably calculated to ensure that the person providing the consent is actually the child’s parent. The Commission also seeks comment on whether the program poses a risk to consumers’ information and whether that risk is outweighed by the benefits of the program. The comment period will last until Sept. 3, 2015.

NOTE: Publication of this Federal Register notice does not indicate Commission approval of the program. The Commission has 120 days to review proposed verifiable parental consent methods and must set forth its conclusions in writing.

The Federal Trade Commission works for consumers to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices and to provide information to help spot, stop, and avoid them.  To file a complaint in English or Spanish, visit the FTC’s online Complaint Assistant or call 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357).  The FTC enters complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure, online database available to more than 2,000 civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.  The FTC’s website provides free information on a variety of consumer topics.  Like the FTC on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to press releases for the latest FTC news and resources.

CARU Conference to Share Best Practices for COPPA Compliance and Marketing to Children

via CARU Conference to Share Best Practices for COPPA Compliance and Marketing to Children.

 

Includes best practices for COPPA compliance relevant to all platforms and a keynote address from Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Commissioner Terrell McSweeny.

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U.S. Senator Bill Nelson sent a letter to Google CEO Larry Page on Tuesday asking the company to detail how it selects content for the YouTube Kids application, and what steps Google is taking to ensure children are not being exposed to unsuitable content. The letter comes a couple of months after a number of consumer advocacy groups filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission FTC regarding the way the app mixes ads and entertainment, as well as a more serious charge filed in May.

via Following FTC Complaints, Senator Nelson Asks Google For Answers On YouTube Kids App Content | TechCrunch.

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The FTC held meetings on the “Internet of Things” earlier this year. As government agencies often do, the Commission issued a report detailing different aspects of this new technological COPPA and the Internet of things compliance issuesrevolution that raise potential privacy concerns and how, for the purposes of this article, COPPA plays into the situation.

via COPPA and the Internet of Things – A New Paradigm.

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The Internet can seem like a place without adult supervision, but in a space where minors are a growing segment of the online audience, companies are subject to a complex landscape of laws, regulations, and codes of conduct attempting to protect young users. When combined with the speed that technology is changing, it can be near-impossible to keep up.

via Mapping The Regulations Protecting Children’s Privacy Online | TechCrunch.

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The Center for Digital Democracy CDD, in its ongoing efforts to monitor the Federal Trade Commission’s enforcement of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act COPPA, has filed a motion in the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia challenging the FTC’s refusal to release important COPPA documentation. The case involves seven “safe harbor” programs, such as KidSAFE and TRUSTe, approved by the FTC to handle website compliance with COPPA regulations.

via CDD asks Court to Require FTC Make Public Infor….

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In 1998, the United States enacted the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, better known as “COPPA.” As the Internet is a worldwide medium, the question many businesses face is whether they should comply with COPPA if the company is not located in the United States?

via When US Child Privacy Laws Apply Online – Data Law – Law Plain and Simple.

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FTC asked to investigate YouTube Kids for deceptively targeting toddlers with ads

Prominent consumer and child advocacy groups Tuesday will ask the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Google’s new YouTube Kids application, arguing that the search engine giant is unfairly and deceptively targeting toddlers with advertising on tablets and smartphones.

 

via FTC asked to investigate YouTube Kids for deceptively targeting toddlers with ads – San Jose Mercury News.

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